mybib.bib

@article{Karus2012.WN,
  author = {Shahbazi, S. and Karunasekera, S. and Harwood, A.},
  title = {{Improving performance in delay/disruption tolerant networks through passive relay points}},
  journal = {Wireless Networks},
  issue_date = {January   2012},
  volume = {18},
  number = {1},
  month = jan,
  year = {2012},
  issn = {1022-0038},
  pages = {9-31},
  numpages = {23},
  url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11276-011-0384-1},
  doi = {10.1007/s11276-011-0384-1},
  acmid = {2124479},
  publisher = {Kluwer Academic Publishers},
  address = {Hingham, MA, USA},
  keywords = {Delay/disruption tolerant networks, Performance evaluation, RFID tags, Ubiquitous network connectivity},
  abstract = {In this paper, we study the case of a limited number of mobile nodes trying to communicate in a large geographic area, forming a delay/disruption tolerant network (DTN). In such networks the mobile nodes are disconnected for significantly long periods of time. Traditional routing protocols proposed for mobile ad hoc networks or mesh networks, which assume at least one path between each source and destination, are ineffective in DTNs. One approach to improve communication is through gossip based protocols because these protocols do not rely on a fixed path. Another approach is to control the movement of the mobile nodes and/or use special mobile nodes called ferry nodes. Others try to employ a fixed infrastructure including stationary relay points. One scheme in stationary relay point approach is to use base stations as relay points which need their own power supply. In this paper, we study a passive approach where mobile nodes deposit/retrieve messages to/ from known stationary locations in the geographic region. Messages are delivered from a source by being deposited at one or more locations that are later visited by the destination. A proposed implementation of our approach using read/writable passive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags, one per point location, is considered in this work. Passive RFID technology is desirable because it operates wirelessly and without the need for attached power. Our simulation results indicate that our approach can achieve competitive message delay and delivery rates. We also demonstrate several techniques for optimizing the stationary relay node placement, namely relay pruning, probability based relay distribution and a genetic algorithm; the genetic algorithm is shown to provide the best solutions to this problem.}
}
@inbook{Karus2011.SocialNetworking,
  author = {Liao, Y. and Moshtaghi, M. and Han, B. and Karunasekera, S. and
Kotagiri, R. and Baldwin, T. and Harwood, A.  and Pattison, P.},
  title = {Computational Social Networks: Mining and Visualization},
  chapter = {Mining Micro-Blogs: Opportunities and Challenges},
  publisher = {Springer-Verlag},
  volume = {3},
  year = {2012},
  series = {London in the Computer Communications and Networks series}
}
@inproceedings{dais11a,
  editor = {Pascal Felber and Romain Rouvoy},
  author = {Yang Liao and
               Aaron Harwood and
               Kotagiri Ramamohanarao},
  title = {ScoreTree: A Decentralized Framework for Credibility Management of User-Generated Content},
  booktitle = {11th IFIP WG 6.1 International Conference on Distributed Applications and Interoperable Systems},
  year = {2011},
  publisher = {Springer},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  volume = {6723},
  isbn = {978-3-642-21386-1},
  location = {Reykjavik, Iceland},
  month = {Jun.},
  pages = {249--256},
  abstract = {Peer-to-peer applications are used in sharing User-Generated Content (UGC) on the Internet and there is a significant need for UGC to be analysed for credibility/quality. A number of schemes have been proposed for deriving credibility of content items by analysing users' feedback, mostly using centralised computations and/or semi-decentralised approaches. In this paper, we propose our P2P schema, ScoreTree, that decentralises a relatively complex credibility management algorithm by aggregating distributed evaluations and delivering an estimate of credibility for each interested content item. Our experiments show that our schema compares favourably with existing decentralised approaches including a gossip message based implementation of ScoreFinder, and a widely adopted P2P application called Vuze.}
}
@inproceedings{Karus2011.AINA,
  title = {{On Placement of Passive Stationary Relay Points in Delay Tolerant Networking}},
  author = {Shahbazi, S. and Harwood, A. and Karunasekera,  S.},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 24th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Information Networking and Applications (AINA), 2011},
  year = {2011},
  month = {March},
  pages = {764-771},
  publisher = {IEEE Press},
  abstract = {Recently, there has been focus on augmenting Delay/Disruption Tolerant Networks (DTNs) with easily deployable stationary relay nodes making an unconnected infrastructure to facilitate the data delivery by increasing forwarding opportunities. Relay nodes are capable of downloading, storing, and forwarding the data messages from/to the mobile nodes. Placing the relay nodes is an important issue in DTNs as the performance of the network is dependent to their positions. Relay placement is an NP-hard problem hence it makes it a more complicated issue in DTNs. Existing works in the literature are based on simulation which are suffering from computational complexities dictated by simulation. Moreover, they are optimizing the relay placement only based on specific scenarios. In this paper, we propose a generic analytical model in order to evaluate the performance of DTNs in presence of relay nodes. Our model is dependent on the mobile nodes' mobility pattern, and we consider the case when the mobile nodes move according to the random waypoint model. In order to use the proposed model for placing the relays efficiently, we utilize two heuristic approaches. The first approach is based on optimization of the network performance using simulated annealing and the second one relies on a greedy approach to find the best location for each relay one at a time. Our simulation results show that our approaches outperform the simulation based approaches in terms of data delivery performance.}
}
@inproceedings{Karus2011.CCNC,
  title = {{Gossip-based Asynchronous and Robust Aggregation Protocol -- A Pessimistic Approach}},
  author = {Rao, I. and Harwood, A. and Karunasekera, S.},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 8th IEEE Consumer Communications and Networking Conference(CCNC), 2011 },
  year = {2011},
  month = {January},
  pages = {543-548},
  location = {Las Vegas, NV},
  publisher = {IEEE Press},
  abstract = {Gossip-based protocols are one of the popular approaches to estimate aggregates in large scale distributed systems. In this paper, we propose a gossip-based asynchronous and robust protocol to compute aggregates. In our protocol, each node employs the proposed pessimistic approach to exchange its local estimate with one of its neighbors and also uses the proposed recovery scheme which conserves the system mass in the presence of asynchrony and churn. The simulation results presented in this paper show that our protocol yields accurate aggregates in comparatively lesser time.}
}
@inproceedings{DBLP:conf/lcn/RaoHK10,
  author = {Imran Rao and
               Aaron Harwood and
               Shanika Karunasekera},
  title = {A gossip-based asynchronous aggregation protocol for P2P
               systems},
  booktitle = {The 35th Annual IEEE Conference on Local Computer Networks},
  year = {2010},
  pages = {248-251},
  month = {Oct.},
  location = {Denver, Colorado, USA},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/LCN.2010.5735713},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Gossip-based protocols are a popular approach to estimate aggregates in P2P systems. For gossip-based aggregation protocols, the accuracy of the estimated aggregate heavily depends upon conservation of the system mass. In this paper, we present a gossip-based asynchronous aggregation protocol. Our protocol conserves the system mass under asynchronous settings and churn. Simulation results show that our proposed protocol converges to the correct system aggregate even in the presence of very dynamic and adverse network delays and under churn.}
}
@inproceedings{DBLP:conf/globecom/VijayalayanHK10,
  author = {K. S. Vijayalayan and
               Aaron Harwood and
               Shanika Karunasekera},
  title = {Fast Channel Establishment for IEEE 802.16 Wireless Mesh
               Networks},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the Global Communications Conference},
  year = {2010},
  publisher = {IEEE},
  pages = {1-6},
  month = {Dec.},
  location = {Miami, Florida, USA},
  isbn = {978-1-4244-5638-3},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/GLOCOM.2010.5683812},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {IEEE 802.16 based wireless mesh networks (WMNs) are a promising broadband access solution to support flexibility, cost effectiveness and fast deployment of the fourth generation infrastructure based wireless networks. Reducing the time for channel establishment is critical for low latency/interactive applications. In this paper, we propose two modifications to the election based transmission timing (EBTT) mechanism used in the coordinated distributed scheduling (CDS) within the IEEE 802.16 standard, which makes use of the standardized signaling messages and formats. Simulation results show that our proposed modifications results in significantly reduced channel establishment delay - up to 75\% with low neighborhood densities - over the standard, and at least 10\% with high neighborhood densities. Moreover, the proposed mechanisms are also applicable for the three-hop extended neighborhood CDS when required.}
}
@inproceedings{DBLP:conf/hpcc/RaoHK10,
  author = {Imran Rao and
               Aaron Harwood and
               Shanika Karunasekera},
  title = {On Problem for Aggregate Node Selection for Unstructured
               Overlay Networks},
  booktitle = {12th IEEE International Conference on High Performance Computing
               and Communications},
  year = {2010},
  pages = {369-375},
  publisher = {IEEE},
  month = {Sep.},
  location = {Melbourne, Australia},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/HPCC.2010.111},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {With the success of the peer-to-peer systems, there is an emerging trend to develop an aggregation service that can provide global information about these distributed and decentralized overlays. Existing aggregation protocols have focused on providing an efficient and cost effective solution to compute aggregates. In this paper, we are interested to search the node based on an aggregate query over rapidly changing data e.g., to seek a node with minimum/maximum workload in the network. Solution to such queries can benefit number of applications such as, node-ranking, reputation building, resource scheduling, etc. Here we propose a novel protocol to solve such queries. Our proposed protocol is reactive and pull-based in nature. It intrinsically builds and manages a routing table which routes aggregate query to the desired node in the system. We evaluated our protocol for accuracy, efficiency and communication cost through detailed simulations. We also discuss effects of an explicit routing table management scheme and show that this explicit scheme causes our protocol to work better in presence of churn and node failures.}
}
@inproceedings{DBLP:conf/icpads/RaoHK10,
  author = {Imran Rao and
               Aaron Harwood and
               Shanika Karunasekera},
  title = {Impacts of Asynchrony on Epidemic-Style Aggregation Protocols},
  booktitle = {IEEE 16th International Conference on Parallel and Distributed
               Systems},
  year = {2010},
  pages = {601-608},
  month = {Dec.},
  location = {Shanghai, China},
  publisher = {IEEE},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICPADS.2010.130},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {The large scale and dynamic nature of a distributed system makes it difficult to collect the attributes of the individual nodes in the network. In these systems, often an aggregate (e.g. AVG, COUNT, MIN, MAX, SUM etc) of these attributes is adequate. Epidemic-style protocols are one of the popular approaches to estimate aggregates in such systems. In existing epidemic-style aggregation protocols the accuracy of the estimated aggregate at local nodes heavily depends upon synchronization of aggregation rounds. To enforce synchronization in these protocols, length of aggregation round should be long enough so that all the nodes in the system complete their aggregation information exchange. In this paper, we study the impacts of asynchrony in epidemic-style aggregation protocols. We present a simple asynchronous technique to estimate system aggregates in a distributed system. Based upon this technique, we analyze two popular existing epidemic-style aggregation protocols, Push-Pull and Push-Sum. Through detailed simulations, we evaluate accuracy and cost of asynchronous version of these protocols. We found that to obtain an estimate of the true system aggregate, aggregation protocols do not need to be synchronized and hence an efficient estimate can be obtained in lesser time.}
}
@inproceedings{10.1109/NSS.2010.68,
  author = {Thaneswaran Velauthapillai and Aaron Harwood and Shanika Karunasekera},
  title = {Global Detection of Flooding-Based DDoS Attacks Using a Cooperative Overlay Network},
  booktitle = {International Conference on Network and System Security},
  volume = {0},
  isbn = {978-0-7695-4159-4},
  year = {2010},
  pages = {357-364},
  doi = {http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/NSS.2010.68},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  address = {Los Alamitos, CA, USA},
  abstract = {Flooding-based Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks present a serious threat to the stability of the Internet. Identifying the attacks rapidly and accurately is significant for the efficient operation of Internet applications and services. Recent observations in the U.S. indicate a significant increase of cyber attacks on U.S. military information systems in 2009. Current technologies are still unable to withstand large-scale DDoS attacks. Single point detection and response is a first step to defeat such distributed attacks. Distributed global defense systems, using a coordinated effort, go much further towards thwarting such attacks. In this paper, we propose a distributed defense infrastructure to detect DDoS attacks globally using a cooperative overlay network and a gossip-based information exchange protocol. Our NS2 based simulation results show that the proposed solution can detect attacks with a detection rate as high as 0.99 with false alarms below 0.01. This compares favorably against other widely known methods including change-point detection, TTL analysis and wavelet analysis.}
}
@inproceedings{DBLP:conf/pakdd/LiaoHR10,
  editor = {Mohammed Javeed Zaki and
               Jeffrey Xu Yu and
               B. Ravindran and
               Vikram Pudi},
  author = {Yang Liao and
               Aaron Harwood and
               Kotagiri Ramamohanarao},
  title = {Decentralisation of ScoreFinder: A Framework for Credibility
               Management on User-Generated Contents},
  booktitle = {Advances in Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining, 14th Pacific-Asia
               Conference},
  year = {2010},
  publisher = {Springer},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  volume = {6119},
  isbn = {978-3-642-13671-9},
  location = {Hyperabad, India},
  month = {Jun.},
  pages = {272-282},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-13672-6_27},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {User-generated content (UGC) from Internet users has significant value only when its credibility can be established. A basic approach to establishing credibility is to take an average of scores from annotators, while more sophisticated approaches have been used to eliminate anomalous scoring behaviour by giving different weights to scores from different annotator profiles. A number of applications such as file sharing and article reviewing use a decentralised architecture. While computing a weighted average of static values in a decentralised application is well studied, sophisticated UGC algorithms are more complicated since source values to be aggregated and their weights may change in time. In our work we consider a centralised credibility management algorithm, ScoreFinder, as an example, and show both structured and unstructured approaches for computing time-dependent weighted average values in peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. Experimental results on two real data sets demonstrate that our approaches converge and deliver results comparable to those from the centralised version of ScoreFinder. }
}
@inproceedings{DBLP:conf/icde/LiaoHR10,
  editor = {Feifei Li and
               Mirella M. Moro and
               Shahram Ghandeharizadeh and
               Jayant R. Haritsa and
               Gerhard Weikum and
               Michael J. Carey and
               Fabio Casati and
               Edward Y. Chang and
               Ioana Manolescu and
               Sharad Mehrotra and
               Umeshwar Dayal and
               Vassilis J. Tsotras},
  author = {Yang Liao and
               Aaron Harwood and
               Kotagiri Ramamohanarao},
  title = {ScoreFinder: A method for collaborative quality inference
               on user-generated content},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 26th International Conference on Data
               Engineering},
  year = {2010},
  pages = {345-348},
  publisher = {IEEE},
  location = {Long Beach, California},
  month = {Mar.},
  isbn = {978-1-4244-5444-0},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICDE.2010.5447878},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {User-generated content is quickly becoming the greatest source of information on the World Wide Web and is expected to drive Web 2.0 development over the next 10 years. In many cases we can model this information in terms of \emph{articles}, where each user has submitted a number of articles to the Web. Such articles are initially considered \emph{unconfirmed} in the sense that their \emph{credibility} has not yet been established. Conventional, centralized confirmation of credibility is infeasible at the Internet scale and so making use of the \emph{annotators} themselves to evaluate each article is essential. However, annotators usually differ in opinions to the same article, and the existence of bias, variance and maliciousness makes the problem of aggregating opinions more difficult.

Addressing this problem, we propose the use of an \emph{Author-Annotator model} with an iterative algorithm, called \emph{ScoreFinder}, for inferring credibility by ranking articles, given annotator scores, annotator confidence and topics for each article. In order to reduce the influence from a variety of error sources, we identify reliable annotators on each topic, and adaptively aggregate scores from them. Moreover, we transform the annotators' input to remove errors/anomalies, by identifying patterns of misbehaviour learned from a real data set. We show how our algorithm performs on both real data sets and synthetic data sets; the results reveal that ScoreFinder's performance is up to 70 percent better than the baseline on the synthetic data sets.}
}
@article{GeoffreyChu_etal2009,
  author = {Geoffrey Chu and Aaron Harwood and Peter Stuckey},
  title = {Cache Conscious Data Structures for Boolean Satisfiability Solvers},
  journal = {Journal on Satisfiability, Boolean Modeling and Computation (JSAT)},
  year = {2009},
  volume = {6},
  pages = {99--120},
  optnote = {Also available as http://jsat.ewi.tudelft.nl/content/volume6/JSAT6\textit{6}Chu.pdf},
  optnote = {exported from refbase (http://demo.refbase.net/show.php?record=40410), last updated on Mon, 13 Jul 2009 23:03:10 +0200},
  issn = {1574-0617},
  opturl = {http://jsat.ewi.tudelft.nl/content/volume6/JSAT6_6_Chu.pdf},
  abstract = {Current SAT solvers are well engineered and highly efficient, and significant research
effort has been put into creating data structures that can produce maximal efficiency for
the core propagation engine within SAT solvers. However, there is still substantial room
for improvement. As the disparity between CPU speeds and cache sizes have increased,
cache conscious data structures and algorithms have become very important. They are even
more important in the context of parallel SAT solving, as issues like cache contention and
main memory contention can dramatically slow down a parallel SAT solver. We present
a series of data structure and algorithmic modifications that are able to increase the core
propagation speed of MiniSat 2.0 by an average of 80\% on a set of medium sized industrial
instances, and increase the speed of a parallelized version of MiniSat running with 8 threads
by 140\% on those same instances.}
}
@inproceedings{saeed09,
  author = {Saeed Shahbazi and Aaron Harwood and Shanika Karunasekera},
  title = {An Analytical Model for Performance Evaluation in Sparse Mobile Ad hoc Networks},
  booktitle = {Wireless Days, 2009. WD '09. 1st IFIP},
  year = {2009},
  month = {Dec.},
  pages = {6}
}
@inproceedings{DBLP:conf/ivic/SundararajanHRP09,
  author = {Elankovan Sundararajan and
               Aaron Harwood and
               Kotagiri Ramamohanarao and
               Anton Satria Prabuwono},
  title = {Event Based Simulator for Parallel Computing over the Wide
               Area Network for Real Time Visualization},
  booktitle = {IVIC},
  year = {2009},
  pages = {573-584},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-05036-7_54},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/ivic/2009},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {As the computational requirement of applications in computational science
continues to grow tremendously, the use of computational resources distributed
across the Wide Area Network (WAN) becomes advantageous. However, not
all applications can be executed over the WAN due to communication overhead
that can drastically slowdown the computation. In this paper, we introduce an
event based simulator to investigate the performance of parallel algorithms
executed over the WAN. The event based simulator known as SIMPAR
(SIMulation for PARallel computing), simulates the actual computations and
communications involved in parallel computation over the WAN using time
stamps. The results from the simulation show concurrence with the expected
performance using the L-BSP model.}
}
@inproceedings{DBLP:conf/pdcat/NiH09,
  author = {Lei Ni and
               Aaron Harwood},
  title = {P2P-Tuple: Towards a Robust Volunteer Computing Platform},
  booktitle = {PDCAT},
  year = {2009},
  pages = {217-223},
  ee = {http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/PDCAT.2009.76},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/pdcat/2009},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {The evolution of emerging Volunteer Computing systems is placing an ever greater emphasis on
the use of a loosely 
coupled decentralized architecture, mainly to address concerns of scalability and robustness. We 
propose to build the next generation Volunteer Computing systems on top of well studied 
Peer-to-Peer techniques to fully take advantage of its decentralized characteristic and its 
very large, shared data storage capacity. This paper sketches the design of such a completely
decentralized and fault tolerant Volunteer Computing system by using a Peer-to-Peer based Tuple
Space formed by volunteer peers. The design emphasizes fault tolerance mechanisms 
for handling a high churn environment. Both simulation and software prototype evaluation results 
show support for the proposed design and the Tuple Space based architecture. Large scale experiments
on PlanetLab show our system operating at a constant efficiency of roughly 66\% as the system
scales up, with all peers having a mean time to failure of 2 hours.
		}
}
@article{1525760,
  author = {Risson, John and Harwood, Aaron and Moors, Tim},
  title = {Topology Dissemination for Reliable One-Hop Distributed
		  Hash Tables},
  journal = {IEEE Trans. Parallel Distrib. Syst.},
  volume = {20},
  number = {5},
  year = {2009},
  issn = {1045-9219},
  pages = {680--694},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/TPDS.2008.145},
  publisher = {IEEE Press},
  address = {Piscataway, NJ, USA},
  abstract = {Many distributed hash tables (DHTs) resolve lookups in
		  $O(\log n)$ hops, where n is the number of nodes. One-hop
		  DHTs give lower lookup latencies and lower lookup failure
		  rates. However, it is hard to maintain large, wide-area
		  one-hop topologies. We contribute aecast, a new topology
		  dissemination algorithm for one-hop DHTs. It avoids
		  expensive repair mechanisms and critical points of failure
		  in existing one-hop DHTs. When a node discovers by
		  anti-entropy that it has missed a topology update, it
		  initiates ``controlled flooding," sending the update to
		  nodes in the multicast tree that also missed the update. We
		  compare aecast with a widely cited epidemic multicasting
		  algorithm, pbcast, by analysis and simulation. Aecast gives
		  at least fivefold fewer out-of-date nodes on average within
		  one round of a topology update. We support it with a
		  fault-tolerant topology agreement protocol, so that only
		  legitimate topology changes propagate throughout the
		  overlay. Consequently, we argue that one-hop DHTs deserve
		  greater attention for Internet applications in which
		  reasonably reliable nodes carry high lookup loads.}
}
@article{rajiv08,
  location = {http://www.scientificcommons.org/43251512},
  title = {Abstract A Self-Organising Federation of Alchemi Desktop Grids},
  author = {Rajiv Ranjan and Xingchen Chu and Carlos A. Queiroz and Aaron Harwood and Rajkumar Buyya},
  year = {2008},
  abstract = {Desktop grids presents a next generation platform for aggregating the idle processing cycles of desktop computers. However, in order to efficiently harness the power of millions of desktop computers, the systems or middlewares that can support high level of efficiency, scalability, robustness and manageability are required. In this paper, we propose a scalable and self-organising desktop grid system, Alchemi-Federation, which uses a Peer-to-Peer (P2P) network model for discovering and coordinating the provisioning of distributed Alchemi grids. Alchemi grids self-organise based on a structured P2P routing overlay that maintains a d-dimensional index for resource discovery. The unique features of Alchemi-Federation are: (i) Internet-based federation of distributed Alchemi grids; (ii) implementation of a P2P publish/subscribe based resource indexing service that makes the system highly scalable; and (iii) implementation of a P2P tuple space-based distributed load-balancing algorithm. 1},
  url = {http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.63.4248},
  institution = {CiteSeerX - Scientific Literature Digital Library and Search Engine [http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/oai2] (United States)}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/hpdc/raohk08,
  author = {Imran Rao and Aaron Harwood and Shanika Karunasekera},
  title = {An unstructured peer-to-peer approach to aggregate node
		  selection},
  booktitle = {HPDC},
  year = {2008},
  pages = {209-212},
  ee = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1383422.1383450},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/hpdc/2008},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {In distributed and high performance applications it it is
		  necessary to discover the aggregate resource capabilities
		  of the collaborating peers. Another requirement of these
		  applications is to locate the resources meeting the given
		  aggregate search criteria. In this paper we present an
		  unstructured peer-to-peer approach to aggregate node
		  selection for resource management. Our objective is to
		  efficiently calculate the aggregate value and search the
		  aggregate node whose attribute matches or falls in the
		  proximity of this value. Our contribution also includes the
		  inclusion of an explicit network for aggregate query
		  routing. We evaluated our protocol for accuracy, efficiency
		  and communication cost through detailed simulations.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/icpads/shahbazihk08,
  author = {Saeed Shahbazi and Aaron Harwood and Shanika
		  Karunasekera},
  title = {Achieving Ubiquitous Network Connectivity Using an RFID
		  Tag-Based Routing Protocol},
  booktitle = {ICPADS},
  year = {2008},
  pages = {391-398},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICPADS.2008.29},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/icpads/2008},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Ubiquitous network connectivity is challenged in areas
		  outside of the range of wireless base stations and cellular
		  networks. In such networks the mobile nodes are
		  disconnected for significantly long periods of time. In
		  this paper, we propose an approach where mobile nodes
		  deposit/retrieve messages to/from known point locations in
		  the geographic region. Messages are delivered from a source
		  by being deposited at one or more locations that are later
		  visited by the destination. We propose the use of passive,
		  read/writable radio frequency identification tags, one per
		  point location. Our simulation results indicate that our
		  approach can achieve competitive message latency and
		  delivery rates. We also provide techniques for optimizing
		  the tag placement, including tag pruning, probability based
		  tag distribution and a genetic algorithm; the genetic
		  algorithm is shown to provide the best solutions to this
		  problem.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/pdcat/nih08,
  author = {Lei Ni and Aaron Harwood},
  title = {An Adaptive Checkpointing Scheme for Peer-to-Peer Based
		  Volunteer Computing Work Flows},
  booktitle = {PDCAT},
  year = {2008},
  pages = {227-234},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/PDCAT.2008.53},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/pdcat/2008},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Volunteer computing, sometimes called public resource
		  computing, is an emerging computational model that is very
		  suitable for work-pooled parallel processing. As more
		  complex grid applications make use of work flows in their
		  design and deployment it is reasonable to consider the
		  impact of work flow deployment over a volunteer computing
		  infrastructure. In this case, the inter work flow I/O can
		  lead to a significant increase in I/O demands at the work
		  pool server. A possible solution is the use of a
		  peer-to-peer based parallel computing architecture to
		  off-load this I/O demand to the workers; where the workers
		  can fulfill some aspects of work flow coordination and I/O
		  checking, etc. However, achieving robustness in such a
		  large scale system is a challenging hurdle towards the
		  decentralized execution of work flows and general parallel
		  processes. To increase robustness, we propose and show the
		  merits of using an adaptive checkpoint scheme that
		  efficiently checkpoints the status of the parallel
		  processes according to the estimation of relevant network
		  and peer parameters. Based on our proposed mathematical
		  checkpoint model, our scheme uses statistical data observed
		  during runtime to dynamically make checkpoint decisions in
		  a completely decentralized manner. The results of
		  simulation show support for our proposed approach in terms
		  of reduced required runtime.}
}
@article{dblp:journals/fgcs/ranjanhb08,
  author = {Rajiv Ranjan and Aaron Harwood and Rajkumar Buyya},
  title = {A case for cooperative and incentive-based federation of
		  distributed clusters},
  journal = {Future Generation Comp. Syst.},
  volume = {24},
  number = {4},
  year = {2008},
  pages = {280-295},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.future.2007.05.006},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Research interest in Grid computing has grown
		  significantly over the past five years. Management of
		  distributed resources is one of the key issues in Grid
		  computing. Central to management of resources is the
		  effectiveness of resource allocation as it determines the
		  overall utility of the system. The current approaches to
		  brokering in a Grid environment are non-coordinated since
		  application-level schedulers or brokers make scheduling
		  decisions independently of the others in the system.
		  Clearly, this can exacerbate the load sharing and
		  utilization problems of distributed resources due to
		  sub-optimal schedules that are likely to occur. To overcome
		  these limitations, we propose a mechanism for coordinated
		  sharing of distributed clusters based on computational
		  economy. The resulting environment, called Grid-Federation,
		  allows the transparent use of resources from the federation
		  when local resources are insufficient to meet its users'
		  requirements. The use of computational economy methodology
		  in coordinating resource allocation not only facilitates
		  the Quality of Service (QoS)-based scheduling, but also
		  enhances utility delivered by resources. We show by
		  simulation, while some users that are local to popular
		  resources can experience higher cost and/or longer delays,
		  the overall users' QoS demands across the federation are
		  better met. Also, the federation's average case
		  message-passing complexity is seen to be scalable, though
		  some jobs in the system may lead to large numbers of
		  messages before being scheduled.}
}
@article{dblp:journals/comsur/ranjanhb08,
  author = {Rajiv Ranjan and Aaron Harwood and Rajkumar Buyya},
  title = {Peer-to-peer-based resource discovery In global grids: A
		  tutorial},
  journal = {IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials},
  volume = {10},
  number = {1-4},
  year = {2008},
  pages = {6-33},
  ee = {http://dl.comsoc.org/cocoon/comsoc/servlets/OntologySearch?query={\&}node=TOC2009{\&}render=false{\&}type=1},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {An efficient resource discovery mechanism is one of the
		  fundamental requirements for grid computing systems, as it
		  aids in resource management and scheduling of applications.
		  Resource discovery activity involves searching for the
		  appropriate resource types that match the user's
		  application requirements. Various kinds of solutions to
		  grid resource discovery have been suggested, including
		  centralized and hierarchical information server approaches.
		  However, both of these approaches have serious limitations
		  in regard to scalability, fault tolerance, and network
		  congestion. To overcome these limitations, indexing
		  resource information using a decentralized (e.g.,
		  peer-to-peer (P2P)) network model has been actively
		  proposed in the past few years. This article investigates
		  various decentralized resource discovery techniques
		  primarily driven by the P2P network model. To summarize,
		  this article presents a: summary of the current state of
		  the art in grid resource discovery, resource taxonomy with
		  focus on the computational grid paradigm, P2P taxonomy with
		  a focus on extending the current structured systems (e.g.,
		  distributed hash tables) for indexing d-dimensional grid
		  resource queries, a detailed survey of existing work that
		  can support rf-dimensional grid resource queries, and
		  classification of the surveyed approaches based on the
		  proposed P2P taxonomy. We believe that this taxonomy and
		  its mapping to relevant systems would be useful for
		  academic and industry-based researchers who are engaged in
		  the design of scalable grid and P2P systems.}
}
@article{dblp:journals/vldb/taninhs07,
  author = {Egemen Tanin and Aaron Harwood and Hanan Samet},
  title = {Using a distributed quadtree index in peer-to-peer
		  networks.},
  journal = {VLDB J.},
  volume = {16},
  number = {2},
  year = {2007},
  pages = {165--178},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00778-005-0001-y},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Peer-to-peer (P2P) networks have become a powerful means
		  for online data exchange. Currently, users are primarily
		  utilizing these networks to perform exact-match queries and
		  retrieve complete files. However, future more data
		  intensive applications, such as P2P auction networks, P2P
		  job-search networks, P2P multiplayer games, will require
		  the capability to respond to more complex queries such as
		  range queries involving numerous data types including those
		  that have a spatial component. In this paper, a distributed
		  quadtree index that adapts the MX-CIF quadtree is described
		  that enables more powerful accesses to data in P2P
		  networks. This index has been implemented for various
		  prototype P2P applications and results of experiments are
		  presented. Our index is easy to use, scalable, and exhibits
		  good load-balancing properties. Similar indices can be
		  constructed for various multidimensional data types with
		  both spatial and non-spatial components.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/icpads/harwoodk07,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Santosh Kulkani},
  title = {Delay sensitive identity protection in peer-to-peer online
		  gaming environments},
  booktitle = {ICPADS},
  year = {2007},
  pages = {1-6},
  ee = {http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/ICPADS.2007.4447811},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/icpads/2007},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Peer-to-peer computing overcomes communication bottleneck
		  problems associated with centralized game servers and
		  provides an alternative mechanism to support massively
		  multi-player online gaming (MMOG) applications. A potential
		  security problem associated with this approach relates to
		  player identity. In an MMOG, users from different parts of
		  the network interact with each other in a virtual world. In
		  a peer-to-peer model, these interactions happen directly
		  between the peers and this leads to the IP addresses of
		  peers being available in the network packets. Malicious
		  users can extract the IP addresses of their opponents and
		  the information can be used to gain unfair advantage by
		  compromising their opponents' computers. The well known
		  approach to this problem is the use of anonymizing networks
		  (onion routing and mixing), that anonymize the sender and
		  the destination IP addresses from the peers along a path.
		  However this approach introduces significant delays which
		  are not desirable in MMOG applications. This paper proposes
		  the use of a secret shared key to reduce computational
		  delay and also provides a theoretical framework for trading
		  off the strength of anonymity for reduced delay with
		  respect to classes of interactions in the MMOG. The results
		  suggest that appropriately low delays can be achieved with
		  small reductions in anonymity strength.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/icpads/nih07,
  author = {Lei Ni and Aaron Harwood},
  title = {A comparative study on Peer-to-Peer failure rate
		  estimation},
  booktitle = {ICPADS},
  year = {2007},
  pages = {1-7},
  ee = {http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/ICPADS.2007.4447815},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/icpads/2007},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {The robustness of Peer-to-Peer systems is challenged by
		  its highly dynamic nature. Frequent peer failure and
		  departure events introduce uncertainty for which is
		  considered exceptional in traditional distributed systems.
		  The difficulty of monitoring such large scale networks is
		  further exacerbated because it has to be done in a
		  completely decentralized way for both scalability and
		  reliability concerns. Some methods for estimating peer
		  failure rate have been applied in Peer-to-Peer systems,
		  however their comparative performance has not yet been
		  reported in the literature. We simulate three different
		  failure rate estimation methods and compare their accuracy
		  and response time with respect to sample size,
		  stabilization interval and neighbour set size. We conclude
		  that the Maximum Likelihood Method introduced is better
		  than the Failure Frequency based Methods commonly used in
		  current Peer-to-Peer systems.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/icpads/huanghk07,
  author = {Chao Huang and Aaron Harwood and Shanika Karunasekera},
  title = {Directions for Peer-to-Peer based mobile pervasive
		  augmented reality gaming},
  booktitle = {ICPADS},
  year = {2007},
  pages = {1-8},
  ee = {http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/ICPADS.2007.4447813},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/icpads/2007},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Pervasive Augmented Reality Gaming and Mobile P2P are both
		  attracting significant focus and much progress has occurred
		  recently. Augmented reality games extend reality with
		  virtual elements to enhance game experience and mobile P2P
		  networks provide autonomous, self-organizing, scalable and
		  robust communication platforms. We review the technological
		  challenges in both mobile P2P computing and AR domains by
		  investigating some existing related works. Then we propose
		  possible directions of the mobile AR collaborative gaming
		  over p2p networks and show its advantages over other AR
		  gaming and discuss the feasibility and future requirements
		  regarding the support for this type of game.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/middleware/chankht07,
  author = {Lipo Chan and Shanika Karunasekera and Aaron Harwood and
		  Egemen Tanin},
  title = {CAESAR: middleware for complex service-oriented
		  peer-to-peer applications},
  booktitle = {MW4SOC},
  year = {2007},
  pages = {12-17},
  ee = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1388336.1388338},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/middleware/2007mw4soc},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Recent research advances in Peer-to-Peer (P2P) computing
		  have enabled the P2P paradigm to be used for developing
		  complex applications beyond file sharing and data storage.
		  These applications have drawn significant benefits,
		  specifically scalability and low cost, from the P2P
		  paradigm. However, the current approach for designing P2P
		  applications introduce issues that prevent the development
		  of high quality complex P2P applications. These issues,
		  namely tight coupling to P2P protocols, limited logic
		  sharing between peers and complicated recovery processes,
		  motivate us to introduce a service-oriented architecture
		  for P2P applications. We have developed a middleware called
		  CAESAR to support the development of service-oriented P2P
		  applications applying the principles of abstraction,
		  dynamic binding, loose coupling and information hiding. In
		  this paper, we discuss the design principles and the
		  components of CAESAR middleware, as well as our experiences
		  in using CAESAR to develop several service-oriented P2P
		  applications.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/otm/raohk07,
  author = {Imran Rao and Aaron Harwood and Shanika Karunasekera},
  title = {Adaptive Expression Based Routing Protocol for P2P
		  Systems},
  booktitle = {OTM Workshops (2)},
  year = {2007},
  pages = {941-949},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-76890-6_20},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/otm/2007-w2},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {There is an emerging trend of using P2P systems for
		  computational and data intensive tasks, such as online
		  collaborations, distributed database applications and
		  message passing interface (MPI) algorithms. For better
		  resource utilization in these and similar applications, it
		  is necessary to discover the resource capabilities of the
		  collaborating peers. Another requirement of these
		  applications is to locate the optimal resource based on a
		  search criteria, e.g., to seek a resource with earliest
		  execution time. We define this kind of routing as
		  expression based routing. However, in the absence of the
		  centralized controlling node, tracking the capabilities of
		  the participating peers is very difficult. Moreover peers
		  join and leave the system dynamically and, thus, makes the
		  discovery of a desired resource even more complex. In this
		  paper we investigate a novel algorithm for expression based
		  routing in a P2P system. It evaluates peer $u$ such that
		  $l_u$ (the value of $u$) is minimum where e.g. $l_u$ is
		  load of the peer $u$. Our contribution includes a detailed
		  algorithm to search for the least loaded peer in the
		  system. We analyze the accuracy and cost of our proposed
		  algorithm through detailed simulations.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/pdcat/sundararajanhr07,
  author = {Elankovan Sundararajan and Aaron Harwood and Kotagiri
		  Ramamohanarao},
  title = {Incorporating Fault Tolerance with Replication on Very
		  Large Scale Grids},
  booktitle = {PDCAT},
  year = {2007},
  pages = {319-328},
  ee = {http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/PDCAT.2007.26},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/pdcat/2007},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Providing fault tolerance for message passing parallel
		  application on a distributed environment is a rule rather
		  than an exception. A node failure can cause the whole
		  computation to stop and has to be restarted from the begin-
		  ning if no fault tolerance is available. However,
		  introducing fault tolerance has some overhead on speedup
		  that can be achieved. In this paper, we introduce a new
		  technique called replication with cross-over packets for
		  reliability and to in- crease fault tolerance over Very
		  Large Scale Grids (VLSG). This technique has two pronged
		  effect of avoiding single point of failure and single link
		  of failure. We incorporate this new technique into the
		  L-BSP model and show the pos- sible speedup of parallel
		  process. We also derive the achiev- able speedup for some
		  fundamental parallel algorithms us- ing this technique.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/escience/ranjanchkb07,
  author = {Rajiv Ranjan and Lipo Chan and Aaron Harwood and Shanika
		  Karunasekera and Rajkumar Buyya},
  title = {Decentralised Resource Discovery Service for Large Scale
		  Federated Grids},
  booktitle = {eScience},
  year = {2007},
  pages = {379-387},
  ee = {http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/E-SCIENCE.2007.27},
  crossref = {DBLP:conf/eScience/2007},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Efficient Resource discovery mechanism is one of the
		  fundamental requirement for Grid computing systems, as it
		  aids in resource management and scheduling of applications.
		  Resource discovery involves searching for resources that
		  match the user's application requirements. Various kinds of
		  solutions to Grid resource discovery have been developed,
		  including the centralised and hierarchical information
		  server approach. However, these approaches have serious
		  limitations in regards to scalability, fault-tolerance and
		  network congestion. To overcome such limitations, we
		  propose a decentralised Grid resource discovery system
		  based on a spatial publish/subscribe index. It utilises a
		  Distributed Hash Table (DHT) routing substrate for
		  delegation of d-dimensional service messages. Our approach
		  has been validated using a simulated publish/subscribe
		  index that assigns regions of a d-dimensional resource
		  attribute space to the Grid peers in the system. We
		  generated the resource attribute distribution using the
		  configurations obtained from the Top 500 Supercomputer
		  list. The simulation study takes into account various
		  parameters such as resource query rate, index load
		  distribution, number of index messages generated, overlay
		  routing hops and system size. Our results show that grid
		  resource query rate directly affects the performance of the
		  decentralised resource discovery system, and that at higher
		  rates the queries can experience considerable latencies.
		  Further, contrary to what one can expect, system size does
		  not have a significant impact on the performance of the
		  system, in particular the query latency.}
}
@inproceedings{rajiv06,
  author = {Rajiv Ranjan and Aaron Harwood and Rajkumar Buyya},
  title = {A {SLA}-Based Coordinated Superscheduling Scheme and
		  Performance for Computational Grids},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 8th IEEE International Conference on
		  Cluster Computing (Cluster 2006)},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society Press},
  month = sep,
  pages = {8 pages},
  year = {2006},
  abstract = {The Service Level Agreement~(SLA) based grid
		  superscheduling approach promotes coordinated resource
		  sharing. Superscheduling is facilitated between
		  administratively and topologically distributed grid sites
		  by grid schedulers such as Resource brokers. In this work,
		  we present a market-based SLA coordination mechanism. We
		  based our SLA model on a well known \emph{contract net
		  protocol}. The key advantages of our approach are that it
		  allows:~(i) resource owners to have finer degree of control
		  over the resource allocation that was previously not
		  possible through traditional mechanism; and (ii)
		  superschedulers to bid for SLA contracts in the contract
		  net with focus on completing the job within the user
		  specified deadline. In this work, we use simulation to show
		  the effectiveness of our proposed approach.},
  location = {Barcelona, Spain}
}
@inproceedings{1186679,
  author = {Lei Ni and Aaron Harwood and Peter J. Stuckey},
  title = {Realizing the e-science desktop peer using a peer-to-peer
		  distributed virtual machine middleware},
  booktitle = {MCG '06: Proceedings of the 4th international workshop on
		  Middleware for grid computing},
  year = {2006},
  isbn = {1-59593-581-9},
  pages = {7 pages},
  location = {Melbourne, Australia},
  doi = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1186675.1186679},
  publisher = {ACM Press},
  address = {New York, NY, USA},
  abstract = {Emerging e-Science applications face the challenge of
		  providing both high performance and low maintenance cost
		  infrastructure. We propose the e-Science Desktop Peer
		  system and a prototype middleware implementation called
		  P2P-DVM to address this challenge, that is designed to
		  allow scientists' resources to be readily shared over the
		  Internet in a Peer-to-Peer (P2P) manner. Our P2P-DVM
		  currently supports the Message Passing Interface and Bulk
		  Synchronous Processing model over an adaptive P2P network
		  and we introduce a Programming Environment Abstraction
		  Layer to allow users to quickly adapt other programming
		  environments to our P2P approach. P2P-DVM provides
		  decentralized coordinated checkpoint and restart
		  functionality, message passing over P2P networks, and
		  distributed storage for scalability. Our experimental
		  results on the PlanetLab testbed shows support for our
		  work.}
}
@article{1116043,
  author = {Egemen Tanin and Aaron Harwood and Hanan Samet and Deepa
		  Nayar and Sarana Nutanong},
  title = {Building and Querying a {P2P} Virtual World},
  journal = {Geoinformatica},
  volume = {10},
  number = {1},
  year = {2006},
  issn = {1384-6175},
  pages = {91--116},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10707-005-4887-8},
  publisher = {Kluwer Academic Publishers},
  address = {Hingham, MA, USA},
  abstract = {Peer-to-Peer (P2P) systems are known to provide excellent
		  scalability i n a networked environment. One peer is
		  introduced to the system by each particip ant. However
		  current P2P applications can only provide file sharing and
		  other fo rms of relatively simple data communications. In
		  this paper, we demonstrate how to index and query a 3D
		  virtual-world on a dynamic distributed network. We prese nt
		  an algorithm for 3D range queries as well as an algorithm
		  for nearest neighbo r queries. We also show how to build
		  such a complex application from the ground level of a P2P
		  routing algorithm.}
}
@misc{rajiv06b,
  author = {Rajiv Ranjan and Rajkumar Buyya and Aaron Harwood},
  title = {A Case for Decentralized Grid Resource Indexing},
  howpublished = {IEEE TCSC Newsletter, Volume 8, No. 2},
  month = nov,
  year = {2006}
}
@misc{ni06,
  author = {Lei Ni and Aaron Harwood},
  title = {{MPICH}-{OP}e{N} on the PlanetLab Infrastructure},
  note = {Software demonstration},
  booktitle = {Pacific Rim Applications and Grid Middleware Assembly,
		  10th Workshop},
  year = {2006},
  location = {Townsville, Australia}
}
@inproceedings{1129189,
  author = {Henry Tsai and Aaron Harwood},
  title = {A Scalable Anonymous Server Overlay Network},
  booktitle = {AINA '06: Proceedings of the 20th International Conference
		  on Advanced Information Networking and Applications -
		  Volume 1 (AINA'06)},
  year = {2006},
  pages = {973--978},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/AINA.2006.55},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  address = {Washington, DC, USA},
  abstract = {Large scale malicious activities continue to take place on
		  the Internet. Safeguarding vulnerable computers and servers
		  is therefore important. Recently, systems have been
		  proposed to protect network addresses of computers from
		  malicious adversaries on the Internet. Some of these
		  systems focus specifically on providing client-side
		  anonymity. However, as the Internet bandwidth for average
		  users continues to increase, individuals are increasingly
		  capable of carrying out complicated tasks as servers. It is
		  in the interest of the individuals to gain server anonymity
		  in which the network address of the machine remains
		  protected from malicious activities. In this paper, we
		  present a Scalable Anonymous Server Overlay Network (SASON)
		  that aims at protecting network addresses of all
		  participating servers. SASON also provides reliable server
		  discovery and routing through the use of server pseudonyms
		  and distributed hash-tables.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/iscc/rissonhm06,
  author = {John Risson and Aaron Harwood and Tim Moors},
  title = {Stable High-Capacity One-Hop Distributed Hash Tables.},
  booktitle = {ISCC},
  year = {2006},
  pages = {687--694},
  ee = {http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/ISCC.2006.152},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Most research on Distributed Hash Tables (DHTs) assumes
		  ephemeral, lightly loaded deployments. Each node has a
		  lifetime of a few hours and initiates a lookup once every
		  few seconds or minutes. However, in giant internet data
		  centers, each node has a lifetime of weeks or months and
		  initiates hundreds or thousands of lookups every second. In
		  such an environment, one-hop DHTs are superior to multi-hop
		  DHTs. They use lookup bandwidth more efficiently. We
		  qualify conflicting research to show that a single onehop
		  DHT can indeed scale to at least a few hundred thousand
		  nodes in stable, high-capacity enterprise networks. Two new
		  designs are presented: One Hop Sites (1HS), a high-capacity
		  DHT tailored for site redundancy; and the One Hop
		  Federation (1HF), a global, hierarchic DHT that resolves an
		  open latency problem. For both, the analysis a) confirms
		  linear scalability to at least a few hundred thousand nodes
		  and b) identifies the most sensitive design parameters.}
}
@inproceedings{dblp:conf/icn/rissonqmh06,
  author = {John Risson and Sameer Qazi and Tim Moors and Aaron
		  Harwood},
  title = {A Dependable Global Location Service using Rendezvous on
		  Hierarchic Distributed Hash Tables},
  booktitle = {ICN/ICONS/MCL},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  year = {2006},
  pages = {7},
  ee = {http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/ICNICONSMCL.2006.11},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {A location service is the part of a naming architecture
		  that maps identifiers to network addresses. Ideally, the
		  identifiers are globally unique, persistent and
		  semantic-free. It has been acknowledged that Distributed
		  Hash Tables (DHTs) enable, for the first time, the use of
		  semantic-free identifiers in massive, global networks. We
		  argue that hierarchy is essential for dependability in
		  massive, geographically distributed DHTs. Existing
		  hierarchic DHTs embed location information in identifiers.
		  Consequently, if identifiers move between DHTs in the
		  hierarchy, then the changes always propagate to the root
		  DHT. This Location Information Plane (LIP) design is the
		  first hierarchic DHT that contains moves and changes within
		  the lower layers of the hierarchy. It protects the root DHT
		  using the rendezvous abstraction. We show how it supports
		  global internet telephony networks based on the Session
		  Initiation Protocol (SIP).}
}
@inproceedings{leini06b,
  author = {Lei Ni and Aaron Harwood},
  title = {An Implementation of the Message Passing Interface over an
		  Adaptive Peer-to-Peer Network},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 15th IEEE International Symposium on
		  High Performance Distributed Computing},
  pages = {371--372},
  location = {Paris, France},
  year = {2006},
  absract = {Achieving high performance parallel computing requires
		  both a large scale and reliable system. We describe our
		  design and implementation of the Message Passing Interface,
		  called MPICH-OPeN, for parallel computing over a
		  peer-to-peer network to address this challenge. Our
		  implementation uses the Condor standalone checkpoint
		  library and the Chandy-Lamport algorithm, for reliability,
		  with extensions to make it decentralized. We use the OPeN
		  architecture with an adaptive peer-to-peer protocol that
		  caches connections between peers according to communication
		  requirements of the parallel processes. We used PlanetLab
		  to compare the performance of our implementation to
		  MPICH-P4 and to measure the impact of dynamic peers on
		  parallel program execution.}
}
@inproceedings{1054051,
  author = {Egemen Tanin and Aaron Harwood and Hanan Samet},
  title = {A Distributed Quadtree Index for Peer-to-Peer Settings},
  booktitle = {ICDE '05: Proceedings of the 21st International Conference
		  on Data Engineering (ICDE'05)},
  year = {2005},
  isbn = {0-7695-2285-8},
  pages = {254--255},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/ICDE.2005.7},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  address = {Washington, DC, USA},
  abstract = {Peer-to-peer (P2P) systems are becoming a common form of
		  online data exchange, where users perform exact-match
		  queries and retrieve complete files. Many future, data
		  intensive applications over P2P settings, e.g., P2P auction
		  systems, P2P job-search networks, and P2P multi-player
		  games, will have to answer complex queries over complex
		  data types. This is currently expected from any web-based
		  application that runs with a database system on a
		  client-server setting but is not clearly enabled by today's
		  P2P systems. We present a P2P quadtree-based index that
		  enables more powerful accesses to data intensive
		  applications. We have implemented this index for a
		  prototype P2P application and our experiments show that the
		  proposed index is scalable, efficient to use, and exhibits
		  good load-balancing properties. We believe our work can be
		  applied to various multi-dimensional data types both with
		  spatial and non-spatial attributes. To the best of our
		  knowledge, out technique is superior to all other existing
		  approaches.}
}
@inproceedings{edwards05,
  author = {Chris Edwards and Aaron Harwood and Egemen Tanin},
  title = {Network Virtualisation for Transparent Testing and
		  Experimentation of Distributed Applications},
  year = {2005},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/0.1109/ICON.2005.1635678},
  pages = {1089--1094},
  month = nov,
  volume = {2},
  issn = {1531-2216},
  booktitle = {{IEEE} International Conference on Networks},
  abstract = {Popular network simulation tools, such as ns-2, are useful
		  for undertaking experiments with emerging networking
		  technologies. As networked applications become distributed
		  at scales comparable to the Internet, such as peer-to-peer
		  applications, testing and experimentation becomes
		  increasingly difficult and important. With this paper, we
		  are introducing an elaborate extension to existing
		  simulation capabilities by allowing realistic highly
		  distributed application prototypes to be attached to a
		  simulator for transparent testing and experimentation. We
		  enable developers to focus on building their applications
		  rather than detailing simulation scripts. Testing can then
		  be performed in a natural setting. PDNS is a parallel and
		  distributed version of the commonly used ns-2 simulation
		  package. We describe our extensions to the PDNS simulator
		  which allow real application prototypes to be run across a
		  simulated network. We describe our use of virtualisation as
		  a means for sending an application's network traffic
		  through the simulator. Our implementation allows for large
		  scale simulations with thousands of real peers and
		  hundereds of thousands of simulated nodes in a network,
		  thus we can test real peer-to-peer software at large
		  scales.}
}
@inproceedings{burton05,
  author = {Craig Burton and Aaron Harwood and Shanika Karunasekera
		  and Duana Stanley and Ioanna Ioannou},
  title = {A Distributed Network Architecture for Robust Internet
		  Voting Systems},
  year = {2005},
  booktitle = {Electronic Government: Proceedings of the 4th
		  International Conference on E-Government - EGOV},
  publisher = {Springer-Verlag Heidelberg},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  volume = {3591},
  pages = {300--308},
  location = {Copenhagen, Denmark},
  abstract = {Web-based Internet voting services cannot be provided in a
		  reliable manner where a publicly visible website forms the
		  basis of interacting with voters and collecting votes, as
		  the service cannot resist a distributed denial of service
		  attack. The problem is a profound one for all interactive
		  web services, however, an Internet voting session is a well
		  defined and quite simple interaction and an interactive
		  service similar to web-based voting is proposed. This
		  architecture uses a P2P web cache as the source of a Java
		  voting applet. The applet interacts with the voter via
		  their web browser to collect a vote. The applet then uses a
		  common P2P file sharing network to deposit encrypted votes
		  for collection by the electoral returning officer. The
		  issues of how to authenticate voters and how to provide
		  receipting in such an asynchronous system are described
		  along with premininary findings using a large P2P network
		  established for this purpose. A successful demonstration of
		  this approach may have implications for other mission
		  critical web services which must collect information.}
}
@inproceedings{shanika05,
  author = {Scott Douglas and Egemen Tanin and Aaron Harwood and
		  Shanika Karunasekera},
  title = {Enabling Massively Multi-Player Online Gaming Applications
		  on a {P2P} Architecture},
  year = {2005},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on
		  Information and Automation},
  pages = {7--12},
  location = {Colombo, Sri Lanka},
  abstract = {Recent advances in Peer-to-Peer (P2P) technologies have
		  enabled the use of P2P architectures for developing complex
		  applications such as, Massively Multi-Player Online Games
		  (MMOG). In this paper we address a challenging research
		  problem related to P2P MMOGs; efficient entity maintenance
		  and interaction. We have identified two opposing software
		  engineering approaches to address this problem. The first
		  approach assumes that the entire virtual world and the game
		  logic are implemented using database techniques, e.g., with
		  a distributed index over all the peers and the game
		  semantics built into data query/update functions. The
		  second approach is to separate the entities into completely
		  independent processes, using agentoriented programming
		  techniques. In our work, we propose a combination of these
		  two approaches; the use of a distributed spatial index to
		  facilitate the discovery and querying of relevant entities
		  and an agent-based approach to facilitate real time
		  interactions between the entities. We show the relevant
		  factors for dynamic optimization and the use of a new
		  software architecture with existing game libraries to
		  implement the system.}
}
@misc{shanika05b,
  author = {Shanika Karunasekera and Scott Douglas and Egemen Tanin
		  and Aaron Harwood},
  title = {{P2P} Middleware for Massively Multi-player Online Games},
  booktitle = {Demonstration Proceedings of the ACM/IFIP/USENIX
		  Middleware Conference},
  location = {Grenoble, France},
  year = {2005},
  note = {Software demonstration},
  abstract = {A P2P architecture offers several advantages over
		  centralized architectures for various applications,
		  including MMOG. Decentralization with high scalability and
		  no single point of failure forms the key advantage.
		  Seamlessly unifying many peers under one application,
		  especially for complex P2P applications such as MMOG, forms
		  the main challenge. We demonstrate the use of a P2P
		  middleware which enables the development of such complex
		  applications, and efficient entity maintenance and
		  interactions for the highly interactive and visual P2P MMOG
		  application domain.}
}
@inproceedings{rajiv05a,
  author = {Rajiv Ranjan and Rajkumar Buyya and Aaron Harwood},
  title = {Grid Federation},
  booktitle = {Poster proceedings of the 5th {IEEE} International
		  Symposium on Cluster Computing and Grid},
  pages = {1},
  location = {Cardiff, Wales, UK},
  year = {2005}
}
@inproceedings{rajiv05c,
  author = {Rajiv Ranjan and Rajkumar Buyya and Aaron Harwood},
  title = {A Model for Cooperative Federation of Distributed
		  Clusters},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of The 14th IEEE International Symposium on
		  High Performance Distributed Computing (HPDC-14)},
  pages = {295--296},
  location = {Research Triangle Park, NC},
  month = jul,
  year = {2005},
  abstract = {Interest in Grid computing has grown significantly over
		  the past five years. Management of distributed cluster
		  resources is a key issue in Grid computing. Central to
		  management of resources is the effectiveness of resource
		  allocation, as it determines the overall utility of the
		  system. In this paper, we propose a new Grid system that
		  consists of Grid Federation Agents which couple together
		  distributed cluster resources to enable a cooperative
		  environment.}
}
@inproceedings{rajiv05b,
  author = {Rajiv Ranjan and Rajkumar Buyya and Aaron Harwood},
  title = {A Case for Cooperative and Incentive-Based Coupling of
		  Distributed Clusters},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 7th IEEE International Conference on
		  Cluster Computing - Cluster 2005},
  publisher = {IEEE CS Press},
  month = sep,
  location = {Boston, Massachusetts, USA},
  year = {2005},
  pages = {11},
  abstract = {Interest in Grid computing has grown significantly over
		  the past five years. Management of distributed cluster
		  resources is a key issue in Grid computing. Central to
		  management of resources is the effectiveness of resource
		  allocation, as it determines the overall utility of the
		  system. In this paper, we propose a new Grid system that
		  consists of Grid Federation Agents which couple together
		  distributed cluster resources to enable a cooperative
		  environment. The agents use a computational economy
		  methodology, that facilitates QoS scheduling, with a
		  cost-time scheduling heuristic based on a scalable, shared
		  federation directory. We show by simulation, while some
		  users that are local to popular resources can experience
		  higher cost and/or longer delays, the overall users' QoS
		  demands across the federation are better met. Also, the
		  federation's average case message passing complexity is
		  seen to be scalable, though some jobs in the system may
		  lead to large numbers of messages before being scheduled.}
}
@inproceedings{conf/ispa/sundararajanpkh04,
  title = {Algorithmic-Parameter Optimization of a Parallelized
		  Split-Step Fourier Transform Using a Modified {BSP} Cost
		  Model},
  author = {Elankovan Sundararajan and Malin Premaratne and Shanika
		  Karunasekera and Aaron Harwood},
  bibsource = {DBLP,
		  http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/conf/ispa/ispa2004.html#SundararajanPKH04},
  booktitle = {Parallel and Distributed Processing and Applications,
		  Second InternationalSymposium},
  publisher = {Springer},
  year = {2004},
  volume = {3358},
  editor = {Jiannong Cao and Laurence Tianruo Yang and Minyi Guo and
		  Francis Chi-Moon Lau},
  isbn = {3-540-24128-0},
  pages = {233--244},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  url = {http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=article&issn=0302-9743&volume=3358&spage=233},
  abstract = {Adaptive algorithms are increasingly acknowledged in
		  leading parallel and distributed research. In the past,
		  algorithms were manually tuned to be executed efficiently
		  on a particular architecture. However, interest has shifted
		  towards algorithms that can adapt themselves to the
		  computational resources. A cost model representing the
		  behavior of the system (i.e. system parameters) and the
		  algorithm (i.e algorithm parameters) plays an important
		  role in adaptive parallel algorithms. In this paper, we
		  contribute a computational model based on Bulk Synchronous
		  Parallel processing that predicts performance of a
		  parallelized split-step Fourier transform. We extracted the
		  system parameters of a cluster (upon which our algorithm
		  was executed) and showed the use of an algorithmic
		  parameter in the model that exhibits optimal behavior. Our
		  model can thus be used for the purpose of self-adaption.}
}
@inproceedings{harwood04x,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Egemen Tanin and Minh Truong},
  title = {Fast learning of optimal connections in a peer-to-peer
		  network},
  booktitle = {{IEEE} Proc. International Conference on Networks},
  pages = {284--289},
  location = {Singapore},
  year = {2004},
  abstract = {Peer-to-Peer (P2P) protocol design is widely undertaken
		  with the assumptions that peers and network connections are
		  homogeneous resources. In practice this assumption is
		  untrue. Furthermore, while there are some P2P networks that
		  provide asymptotic cost optimal topology or routing, very
		  few existing protocols combine topology optimization and
		  resource optimization, the resulting performance is
		  resource oblivious. We propose a class of traffic based
		  learning protocols, called $FLOC$ protocols, that learn new
		  connections between neighbors of neighbors. For an average
		  routing table size of $d$ and $n$ peers, our protocol is
		  seen to quickly converge from an inefficient network to an
		  asymptotic cost optimal diameter of $O(\log_d n)$, and
		  simultaneously reduce network delay by approximately 50\%
		  in highly heterogeneous networks. We provide extensive
		  simulation results to show $FLOC$'s behavior.}
}
@inproceedings{tani04,
  author = {E. Tanin and A. Harwood and H. Samet},
  title = {Indexing Distributed Complex Data for Complex Queries},
  booktitle = {dg.o '04: Proceedings of the 2004 annual national
		  conference on Digital government research},
  pages = {81--90},
  year = {2004},
  month = may,
  address = {Seattle, WA},
  publisher = {Digital Government Research Center},
  abstract = {Peer-to-peer networks are becoming a common form of online
		  data exchange. Querying data, mostly files, using keywords
		  on peer-to-peer networks is well-known. But users cannot
		  perform many types of queries on complex data and on many
		  of the attributes of the data on such networks other than
		  mostly exact-match queries. We introduce a distributed
		  hashing-based index for enabling more powerful accesses on
		  complex data over peer-to-peer networks that we expect to
		  be commonly deployed for digital government applications.
		  Preliminary experiments show that our index scales well and
		  we believe that it can be extended to obtain similar
		  indices for many other data types for performing various
		  complex queries, such as range queries.}
}
@inproceedings{harw04,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Anthony Senyard and Minh Tri Truong},
  title = {Artificial Neural Network Development Using {P2P}
		  Networks},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of Artificial Neural Networks in Engineering},
  series = {Intelligent Engineering Systems Through Artificial Neural
		  Networks},
  volume = {14},
  pages = {51--56},
  location = {St. Louis, Missouri},
  year = {2004},
  abstract = {There are many choices when creating an effective
		  artificial neural network for a given problem. The
		  artificial neurons and connections to be used, the network
		  topology, the learning algorithm, the problem
		  representation, all with unique parameters. These choices
		  are continuously enhanced by neural network researchers.
		  The approach taken in this paper is to search through this
		  space of choices and associated parameters using human
		  guidance and experience until an effective combination is
		  found. A peer-to-peer software tool has been implemented to
		  perform this search, called the ANN Grid Toolset. Our
		  toolset allows researchers to share their computing
		  resources, share their learning algorithms and to
		  collectively view the progress of neural network creation.
		  Peer-to-Peer technologies ensures that our toolset is
		  scalable, allowing a large number of resources to be
		  harnessed. We believe that our approach successfully
		  addresses the problem of making appropriate choices for
		  creating an effective artificial neural network.}
}
@inproceedings{1032246,
  author = {Tanin, Egemen and Harwood, Aaron and Samet, Hanan and Nutanong, Sarana and Truong, Minh Tri},
  title = {A serverless 3D world},
  booktitle = {GIS '04: Proceedings of the 12th annual ACM international workshop on Geographic information systems},
  year = {2004},
  isbn = {1-58113-979-9},
  pages = {157--165},
  location = {Washington DC, USA},
  doi = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1032222.1032246},
  publisher = {ACM},
  address = {New York, NY, USA},
  abstract = {Online multi-participant virtual-world systems have attracted significant interest from the Internet community but are hindered by their inability to efficiently support interactivity for a large number of participants. Current solutions divide a large virtual-world into a few mutually exclusive zones, with each zone controlled by a different server, and/or limit the number of participants per server or per virtual-world. Peer-to-Peer (P2P) systems are known to provide excellent scalability in a networked environment (one peer is introduced to the system by each participant), however current P2P applications can only provide file sharing and other forms of relatively simple data communications. In this paper, we present a generic 3D virtual-world application that runs on a P2P network with no central administration or server. Two issues are addressed by this paper to enable such a spatial application on a P2P network. First, we demonstrate how to index and query a 3D space on a dynamic distributed network. Second, we show how to build such a complex application from the ground level of a P2P routing algorithm. Our work leads to new directions for the development of online virtual-worlds that we believe can be used for many government, industry, and public domain applications.}
}
@inproceedings{conf/pdpta/truongh03,
  title = {Distributed Shell over Peer-to-Peer Networks},
  author = {Minh Tri Truong and Aaron Harwood},
  bibsource = {DBLP,
		  http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/conf/pdpta/pdpta2003-1.html#TruongH03},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the International Conference on Parallel
		  and Distributed Processing Techniques and Applications},
  publisher = {CSREA Press},
  year = {2003},
  editor = {Hamid R. Arabnia and Youngsong Mun},
  isbn = {1-892512-41-6},
  pages = {269--278},
  abstract = {Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networking uses a proliferate and
		  powerful paradigm that replaces the traditional
		  client/server communication model with an arbitrary
		  communication model where all hosts or peers are both
		  clients and servers. While P2P is well known for file
		  sharing we developed a P2P system that provides distributed
		  computing. We have developed and currently use a
		  distributed shell over P2P which is a modified version of
		  GNU-Bash that offers the user more computational power by
		  transparently distributing commands over the P2P network.
		  This paper presents the shell over P2P architecture and
		  provides techniques we use to obtain I/O redirection and
		  pipes, parametric computations, cross-file system and
		  heterogeneous computing.}
}
@inproceedings{harwood03b,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Minh Truong},
  title = {Multi-space Distributed Hash Tables for Multiple Transport
		  Domains},
  booktitle = {{IEEE} Proc. International Conference on Networks},
  pages = {283--287},
  year = {2003},
  abstract = {The use of consistent hashing to construct a distributed
		  hash table (DHT) has recently gained significant interest
		  from the distributed computing community, particularly
		  because algorithms have been devised which implement a DHT
		  using peer-to-peer (P2P) technology. However a common
		  assumption is that every node that participates in the DHT
		  is within the same transport domain. Some solutions make to
		  this problem make use of an intermediate overlay network
		  which itself can become messy. Other solutions rely on the
		  widespread use of IPv6 or work-arounds for the limited
		  IPv4. We propose a solution that uses a multi-space DHT
		  algorithm to manifest a DHT space in each transport domain,
		  with bridge nodes linking DHT spaces between transport
		  domains. The ostensive problem with this solution is to
		  ensure that key requests are evenly distributed over all
		  spaces. We provide a framework to solve this problem and
		  give an example solution for a simple 2-space DHT
		  network.}
}
@inproceedings{harwood03c,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Ron Balsys},
  title = {Peer Service Networks --- Distributed {P2P} Middleware},
  booktitle = {{APAC} Conference and Exhibition on Advanced Computing,
		  Grid Applications and eResearch (CD-ROM)},
  note = {19 pages},
  year = {2003},
  abstract = {Massively distributed peer-to-peer (P2P) computing systems
		  offer unprecedented levels of computing power. However
		  there is no widely used peer interface and as a result many
		  P2P systems have been developed to support specific
		  services. This paper proposes a P2P middleware architecture
		  that directly supports the formation of \emph{service
		  networks} based on secure interconnections between peers.
		  The P2P middleware integrates with existing systems by
		  providing transport of standard I/O streams over the P2P
		  network and secure execution of process on remote peers.
		  The P2P middleware supports a \emph{d-shell} or distributed
		  shell for transparently distributing commands. A limited
		  prototype system has been developed using Java and tested
		  by implementing a surface rendering service using a brute
		  force technique as a proof of concept and to illustrate the
		  usefulness of the system.}
}
@techreport{dblp:journals/corr/cs-dc-0302020,
  author = {Aaron Harwood},
  institution = {Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering,
		  University of Melbourne},
  note = {9 pages},
  title = {Analytical formulations of Peer-to-Peer Connection
		  Efficiency},
  year = {2003},
  ee = {http://arxiv.org/abs/cs.DC/0302020},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de},
  abstract = {Use of Peer-to-Peer (P2P) service networks introduces a
		  new communication paradigm because peers are both clients
		  and servers and so each peer may provide/request services
		  to/from other peers. Empirical studies of P2P networks have
		  been undertaken and reveal useful characteristics. However
		  there is to date little analytical work to describe P2P
		  networks with respect to their communication paradigm and
		  their interconnections. This paper provides an analytical
		  formulation and optimisation of peer connection efficiency,
		  in terms of minimising the fraction of wasted connection
		  time. Peer connection efficiency is analysed for both a
		  uni- and multi-connected peer. Given this fundamental
		  optimisation, the paper optimises the number of connections
		  that peers should make use of as a function of network
		  load, in terms of minimising the total queue size that
		  requests in the P2P network experience. The results of this
		  paper provide a basis for engineering high performance P2P
		  interconnection networks. The optimisations are useful for
		  reducing bandwidth and power consumption, e.g. in the case
		  of peers being mobile devices with a limited power supply.
		  Also these results could be used to determine when a
		  (virtual) circuit should be switched to support a
		  connection.}
}
@inproceedings{harwood03e,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Egemen Tanin},
  title = {Hashing Spatial Content over Peer-to-Peer Networks},
  booktitle = {Australian Telecommunications, Networks and Applications
		  Conference (CD-ROM)},
  note = {5 pages},
  year = {2003},
  publisher = {ATNAC},
  abstract = {The Internet has become the common medium for content
		  distribution. Searching content using keywords is
		  well-known. But there are many shortcomings to it. Users
		  cannot search within the content and on many of the
		  attributes of the content, i.e., other than its name.
		  Content is also becoming increasingly decentralized. New
		  mechanisms allowing access to complex distributed content
		  is needed. We introduce a hashing-based method for
		  accessing complex content over large dynamic networks such
		  as peer-to-peer networks, which uses distributed hash
		  tables in a novel way. In particular, we are interested in
		  spatial content that is becoming popular in databases. Our
		  method is scalable, addressing the needs of todays
		  networks.}
}
@inproceedings{harwood02a,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {Random Hierarchies that facilitate Self-Organization},
  year = {2002},
  booktitle = {{IEEE} Proc. The Sixth International Symposium on Parallel
		  Architectures, Algorithms, and Networks},
  pages = {111--116},
  publisher = {{IEEE} Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA},
  editor = {Frank Hsu et al.},
  ee = {http://www.computer.org/proceedings/ispan/1579/15790111abs.htm},
  month = may,
  abstract = {Since it is widely accepted that self-organization is
		  difficult to achieve using constructive or centrally run
		  algorithms a random hierarchy is proposed that
		  intrinsically facilitates self- organization. The random
		  hierarchy consists of each node in the network
		  independently choosing a rank at random such that a mean
		  $2(\Delta-1)\Delta^{i-1}$ nodes have rank $i$, where
		  $\Delta$ is a network wide hierarchy parameter. Each node
		  of rank $i$ chooses the nearest node of rank $i-1$ as its
		  leader which forms the hierarchy. The mean and variance of
		  the relevant properties is derived, for example it is shown
		  that each leader has a mean $\Delta$ followers. Simulations
		  were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed
		  hierarchy and a bare-bones set of procedures where provided
		  that may be used to implement the hierarchy over a network
		  of autonomous nodes in a robust way.}
}
@inproceedings{harwood02b,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {Self-organizing Virtual Networks of High Performance for
		  Wavelength Routing},
  year = {2002},
  pages = {75--82},
  booktitle = {Proc. Third International Conference on Parallel and
		  Distributed Computing, Applications and Technologies},
  location = {Kanazawa, Japan}
}
@phdthesis{harwoodthesis,
  author = {Aaron Harwood},
  title = {High Performance Interconnection Networks},
  year = {2002},
  institution = {Griffith University},
  school = {Computer Science, Griffith University},
  abstract = {The thesis is concerned with the design of high
		  performance interconnection networks for use predominantly
		  in parallel computing systems and wide area networks. The
		  most important characteristic of high performance is low
		  cost, defined as the product of degree and diameter,
		  indicating a combined measure of hardware complexity and
		  worst-cast message routing com- plexity. Furthermore, a
		  high performance network should also have the properties of
		  regular and planar topology, high bisection width and
		  routing simplicity. Specifically, the following problems
		  are studied: (i) constructing the largest possible networks
		  that simultaneously ex- hibit a number of other properties
		  including a small number of edges, high bisection width and
		  planarity; and (ii) implementing high performance
		  communication networks on a scale com- parable to that of
		  the Internet. With respect to specific technology, the
		  thesis addresses the following two questions: (i) exactly
		  how can optical inter-networking be achieved on a world
		  wide scale so as to maximize performance and (ii) just how
		  big can an optical inter-network be, given the
		  present/future technological limits and performance
		  constraints. Abstract continued in document.}
}
@article{374923,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {Using fundamental electrical theory for varying time
		  quantum uni-processor scheduling},
  journal = {J. Syst. Archit.},
  volume = {47},
  number = {2},
  year = {2001},
  issn = {1383-7621},
  pages = {181--192},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1383-7621(00)00065-5},
  publisher = {Elsevier North-Holland, Inc.},
  address = {New York, NY, USA},
  abstract = {Given the total number of instructions to be completed on
		  a uni-processor system and the average cycle time per
		  instruction we introduce a method of calculating time
		  quantum allocation to individual fine grain tasks. The main
		  theory behind our method is based on fundamental equations
		  describing electrical phenomenon. We show how electric
		  circuit analysis can be used to describe the fundamental
		  scheduling problem, and provide a framework for defining
		  more elaborate scheduling problems such as multiprocessor
		  and multicomputer task scheduling. As a matter of physical
		  soundness we demonstrate through unit derivation that our
		  electrical analogy provides proper physical quantities that
		  are supported by current literature. Our analysis shows
		  that variable time round-robin scheduling (VTRR) provides a
		  more appropriate means of scheduling fine-grain tasks than
		  constant time round-robin scheduling (CTRR). We prove that,
		  our VTRR scheduler always completes at least one task per
		  cycle. We show through numerical comparisons some
		  differences between VTRR and CTRR performance.}
}
@article{harwood98c,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {A New Family of Extremal Interconnection Networks},
  journal = {Journal of Interconnection Networks},
  volume = {2},
  number = {4},
  pages = {421--444},
  publisher = {World Scientific Publishing Company},
  year = {2001}
}
@inproceedings{663125,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {Flow Generation for {IP}/{ATM} Label-Switched Routing over
		  Random Networks},
  booktitle = {IPDPS '01: Proceedings of the 15th International Parallel
		  {\&} Distributed Processing Symposium (CDROM)},
  year = {2001},
  isbn = {0-7695-0990-8},
  issn = {1530-2075},
  pages = {6},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  doi = {http://doi.ieeecomputersociety.org/10.1109/IPDPS.2001.924947},
  address = {Washington, DC, USA}
}
@inproceedings{harwood00a,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {Near Optimal Flow Labelling in {ATM}/{IP}-{LSR} Networks
		  using Multi-Segment Flows},
  booktitle = {{IEEE} International Conference on Networks},
  month = sep,
  location = {Singapore},
  publisher = {{IEEE} Computer Society},
  pages = {243--247},
  year = {2000}
}
@inproceedings{harwood00c,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {Batched Circuit Switched Routing for Efficient Service of
		  Requests},
  year = {2000},
  booktitle = {{IEEE} Proc. International Symposium on Parallel
		  Algorithms, Architectures and Networks},
  pages = {30--35},
  location = {Dallas}
}
@inproceedings{298423,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {A method of trading diameter for reduced degree to
		  construct low cost interconnection networks},
  booktitle = {SAC '99: Proceedings of the 1999 ACM symposium on Applied
		  computing},
  year = {1999},
  isbn = {1-58113-086-4},
  pages = {474--480},
  location = {San Antonio, Texas, United States},
  doi = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/298151.298423},
  publisher = {ACM Press},
  address = {New York, NY, USA}
}
@inproceedings{harwood98g,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {Generalized {$\Upsilon$} Networks},
  booktitle = {{$2^{nd}$} International Symposium for High Performance
		  Computing - ISHPC},
  publisher = {Springer-Verlag},
  volume = {1615},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  pages = {304--311},
  location = {Kyoto, Japan},
  month = may,
  year = {1999}
}
@inproceedings{conf/pdpta/harwoods99,
  title = {A Treatise on Physical Information Processing},
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  bibsource = {DBLP,
		  http://dblp.uni-trier.de/db/conf/pdpta/pdpta1999-3.html#HarwoodS99},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the International Conference on Parallel
		  and Distributed Processing Techniques and Applications},
  publisher = {CSREA Press},
  year = {1999},
  editor = {Hamid R. Arabnia},
  isbn = {1-892512-15-7},
  pages = {1530--1536}
}
@inproceedings{harwood99,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {Average Cost of Interconnection Networks},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of the 6th Australasian Conferenence on
		  Parallel and Real-Time Systems},
  pages = {201--212},
  location = {Melbourne, Australia},
  year = {1999}
}
@inproceedings{upsilon1,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {A Low Cost Hybrid Fat-tree Interconnection Network},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of International Conference on Parallel and
		  Distributed Processing and Applications},
  location = {Las Vegas},
  publisher = {CSREA Press},
  pages = {682--689},
  year = {1998}
}
@inproceedings{harwood98a,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  booktitle = {Proceedings of International Conference on Parallel and
		  Distributed Processing and Applications},
  title = {A Class of Interconnection Networks on the Basis of
		  Expanded {$\Upsilon$} Networks},
  location = {Las Vegas},
  pages = {1871--1875},
  publisher = {CSREA Press},
  year = {1998}
}
@inproceedings{harwood98f,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  booktitle = {$2^{nd}$ International Conference on Parallel and
		  Distributed Computing and Networks},
  title = {A Highly Scalable and Low Cost Interconnection Network},
  month = dec,
  location = {Brisbane, Australia},
  pages = {164--169},
  year = {1998}
}
@inproceedings{harwood97,
  author = {Aaron Harwood and Hong Shen},
  title = {Using Fundamental Electrical Theory for Varying Time
		  Quantum Uniprocessor Scheduling},
  booktitle = {Region Ten Conference of the IEEE Speech and Image
		  Technologies for Computing and Telecommunications},
  school = {Griffith University, School of Computers, Information and
		  Technology and School of Microelectronic Engineering},
  location = {Brisbane},
  year = {1997}
}
@proceedings{dblp:conf/hpdc/2008,
  editor = {Manish Parashar and Karsten Schwan and Jon B. Weissman and
		  Domenico Laforenza},
  title = {Proceedings of the 17th International Symposium on
		  High-Performance Distributed Computing (HPDC-17 2008),
		  23-27 June 2008, Boston, MA, USA},
  booktitle = {HPDC},
  publisher = {ACM},
  year = {2008},
  isbn = {978-1-59593-997-5},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de}
}
@proceedings{dblp:conf/icpads/2008,
  title = {14th International Conference on Parallel and Distributed
		  Systems (ICPADS 2008), December 8-10, 2008, Melbourne,
		  Victoria, Australia},
  booktitle = {ICPADS},
  publisher = {IEEE},
  year = {2008},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de}
}
@proceedings{dblp:conf/pdcat/2008,
  title = {Ninth International Conference on Parallel and Distributed
		  Computing, Applications and Technologies, PDCAT 2008,
		  Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand, 1-4 December 2008},
  booktitle = {PDCAT},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  year = {2008},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de}
}
@proceedings{dblp:conf/icpads/2007,
  title = {13th International Conference on Parallel and Distributed
		  Systems (ICPADS 2007), December 5-7, 2007, Hsinchu,
		  Taiwan},
  booktitle = {ICPADS},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  year = {2007},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de}
}
@proceedings{dblp:conf/middleware/2007mw4soc,
  editor = {Karl M. G{\"o}schka and Schahram Dustdar and Frank Leymann
		  and Vladimir Tosic},
  title = {Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Middleware for Service
		  Oriented Computing, MW4SOC 2007, Newport Beach, CA, USA,
		  November 26-30, 2007},
  booktitle = {MW4SOC},
  publisher = {ACM},
  series = {ACM International Conference Proceeding Series},
  year = {2007},
  isbn = {978-1-59593-928-9},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de}
}
@proceedings{dblp:conf/otm/2007-w2,
  editor = {Robert Meersman and Zahir Tari and Pilar Herrero},
  title = {On the Move to Meaningful Internet Systems 2007: OTM 2007
		  Workshops, OTM Confederated International Workshops and
		  Posters, AWeSOMe, CAMS, OTM Academy Doctoral Consortium,
		  MONET, OnToContent, ORM, PerSys, PPN, RDDS, SSWS, and SWWS
		  2007, Vilamoura, Portugal, November 25-30, 2007,
		  Proceedings, Part II},
  booktitle = {OTM Workshops (2)},
  publisher = {Springer},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  volume = {4806},
  year = {2007},
  isbn = {978-3-540-76889-0},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de}
}
@proceedings{dblp:conf/pdcat/2007,
  editor = {David S. Munro and Hong Shen and Quan Z. Sheng and Henry
		  Detmold and Katrina E. Falkner and Cruz Izu and Paul D.
		  Coddington and Bradley Alexander and Si-Qing Zheng},
  title = {Eighth International Conference on Parallel and
		  Distributed Computing, Applications and Technologies (PDCAT
		  2007), 3-6 December 2007, Adelaide, Australia},
  booktitle = {PDCAT},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  year = {2007},
  isbn = {0-7695-3049-4},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de}
}
@proceedings{dblp:conf/escience/2007,
  title = {Third International Conference on e-Science and Grid
		  Computing, e-Science 2007, 10-13 December 2007, Bangalore,
		  India},
  booktitle = {eScience},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  year = {2007},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de}
}
@proceedings{DBLP:conf/pdcat/2009,
  title = {2009 International Conference on Parallel and Distributed
               Computing, Applications and Technologies, PDCAT 2009, Higashi
               Hiroshima, Japan, 8-11 December 2009},
  booktitle = {PDCAT},
  publisher = {IEEE Computer Society},
  year = {2009},
  isbn = {978-0-7695-3914-0},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de}
}
@proceedings{DBLP:conf/ivic/2009,
  editor = {Halimah Badioze Zaman and
               Peter Robinson and
               Maria Petrou and
               Patrick Olivier and
               Heiko Schr{\"o}der and
               Timothy K. Shih},
  title = {Visual Informatics: Bridging Research and Practice, First
               International Visual Informatics Conference, IVIC 2009,
               Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, November 11-13, 2009, Proceedings},
  booktitle = {IVIC},
  publisher = {Springer},
  series = {Lecture Notes in Computer Science},
  volume = {5857},
  year = {2009},
  isbn = {978-3-642-05035-0},
  ee = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-05036-7},
  bibsource = {DBLP, http://dblp.uni-trier.de}
}

This file was generated by bibtex2html 1.96.